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Re: A Daily Prayer for all
Reply #4100 - 10/14/19 at 05:19:39
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Psalm 59:16 (KJV)
But I will sing of thy power; yea, I will sing aloud of thy mercy in the morning: for thou hast been my defence and refuge in the day of my trouble.


Strengthened in Song

When French villagers helped Jewish refugees hide from the Nazis during World War II, some sang songs in the dense forest surrounding their town—letting the refugees know it was safe to come out from hiding. These brave townspeople of Le Chambon-sur-Lignon had answered the call of local pastor André Trocmé and his wife, Magda, to offer wartime refuge to Jews on their windswept plateau known as “La Montagne Protestante.” Their musical signal became just one feature of the villagers’ bravery that helped save up to 3,000 Jews from almost certain death.

In another dangerous time, David sang when his enemy Saul sent nighttime assassins to his house. His use of music wasn’t a signal; rather, it was his song of gratitude to God his refuge. David rejoiced, “I will sing of your strength, in the morning I will sing of your love; for you are my fortress, my refuge in times of trouble” (Psalm 59:16).

Such singing isn’t “whistling in the dark” during danger. Instead, David’s singing conveyed his trust in almighty God. “You, God, are my fortress, my God on whom I can rely” (v. 17).

David’s praise, and the villagers’ singing in Le Chambon, offer an invitation to bless God today with our singing, making melody to Him despite the worries of life. His loving presence will respond, strengthening our hearts.


Reflect & Pray
How do you feel when you’re singing your favorite praise song? Why do praise songs inspire us to feel stronger?

Dear God, strengthen my heart with praises that transform my fears and worries into worship of You.


Insight
In Psalm 59, the author uses the word fortress four times to underscore his view of God during life’s difficulties (vv. 1, 9, 16, 17). A fortress is a place of safety and security. It’s both a place of defense and rest, as well as a place where needs are met. It’s also where the enemy can be safely engaged. In verse 1, God is a fortress who protects from attacks. Verse 9 provides its own unique perspective to the idea of God as fortress. There the author says, “I watch for you.” When danger looms, the psalmist looks in confident expectation for the deliverance of God. He understands that when there’s a threat, nothing provides safety like Him. In recognition of this, we can join him in celebration and praise to God (vv. 16–17).
  

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference.
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Re: A Daily Prayer for all
Reply #4101 - 10/15/19 at 05:45:14
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2 Corinthians 1:11 (KJV)
Ye also helping together by prayer for us, that for the gift bestowed upon us by the means of many persons thanks may be given by many on our behalf.


Haystack Prayers

Samuel Mills and four of his friends often gathered together to pray for God to send more people to share the good news of Jesus. One day in 1806, after returning from their prayer meeting, they got caught in a thunderstorm and took refuge in a haystack. Their weekly prayer gathering then became known as the Haystack Prayer Meeting, which resulted in a global mission movement. Today the Haystack Prayer Monument stands at Williams College in the US as a reminder of what God can do through prayer.

Our heavenly Father is delighted when His children approach Him with a common request. It’s like a family gathering where they’re united in purpose, sharing a common burden.

The apostle Paul acknowledges how God helped him through the prayers of others during a time of severe suffering: “He will continue to deliver us, as you help us by your prayers” (2 Corinthians 1:10–11). God has chosen to use our prayers—especially our prayers together—to accomplish His work in the world. No wonder the verse continues: “Then many will give thanks . . . [for the] answer to the prayers of many.”

Let’s pray together so we can also rejoice together in God’s goodness. Our loving Father is waiting for us to come to Him so He can work through us in ways that reach far beyond anything we could ever imagine.


Reflect & Pray
What request can you and others pray for? How has your faith been strengthened when you pray with others?

Father, help us to pray together even as we work together.


Insight
Paul’s second letter to the Corinthians, more than any of his other New Testament letters, expresses his willingness to do whatever it took to share the heart of Christ (1:3–11; 2:4; 4:7–12; 6:3–10; 11:16–29; 12:6–10). While knowing that some would accuse him of boasting, he wanted his readers to know how deeply he cared for them in the Spirit of Christ who had suffered not only for him, but also for them. In the process, he became a living reflection of the God who, at His own expense, sacrificially intervened, mediated, and interceded for us, so that we in turn could lead and intercede on behalf of others. His prayer is that his readers would join him in discovering for themselves hope in the face of death, strength in weakness, courage in fear, and joy in answered prayer.
  

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference.
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Re: A Daily Prayer for all
Reply #4102 - 10/16/19 at 06:20:50
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1 Thessalonians 4:11 (KJV)
And that ye study to be quiet, and to do your own business, and to work with your own hands, as we commanded you;


Finding a Quiet Life

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” We all heard that question as children and sometimes even as adults. The question is born in curiosity, and the answer is often heard as an indication of ambition. My answers morphed over the years, starting with a cowboy, then a truck driver, followed by a soldier, and I entered college set on becoming a doctor. However, I can’t recall one time that someone suggested or I consciously considered pursuing “a quiet life.”

Yet that’s exactly what Paul told the Thessalonians. First, he urged them to love one another and all of God’s family even more (1 Thessalonians 4:10). Then he gave them a general admonition that would cover whatever specific plow they put their hand to. “Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life” (v. 11). Now what did Paul mean by that exactly? He clarified: “You should mind your own business and work with your hands” so outsiders respect you and you’re not a burden on anyone (vv. 11–12). We don’t want to discourage children from pursuing their giftedness or passions but maybe we could encourage them that whatever they choose to do, they do with a quiet spirit.

Considering the world we live in, the words ambitious and quiet couldn’t seem further apart. But the Scriptures are always relevant, so perhaps we should consider what it might look like to begin living quieter.


Reflect & Pray
How does Paul’s phrase—“mind your own business”—sit with you? Who comes to mind of someone who lives a quiet life that you might emulate?

Jesus, living a quiet life sounds so inviting, but I know it won’t come easily. I ask for the grace to mind my own business, not so I can close myself off from the world, but that I won’t add to the noise.


Insight
Paul’s first letter to the believers in Christ at Thessalonica was one of his most pastoral letters. In chapter 2, he repeatedly refers to them with affection, calling them “brothers and sisters” (vv. 1, 14, 17). Additionally, the apostle describes his own care for them in vivid terms, saying he and his team didn’t come to them authoritatively, but as “young children” (v. 7). Also in verse 7, Paul actually describes himself as being like a “nursing mother” who lovingly nurses her children. As further evidence of his great love for them, Paul speaks of his labor for them in the gospel and ultimately closes the loop of family descriptors by portraying himself as a father caring for his children (vv. 8–11). All of these examples combine not only to make this one of Paul’s most pastoral letters, but one of his most personal as well.
  

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference.
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Re: A Daily Prayer for all
Reply #4103 - 10/17/19 at 05:51:16
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Ezekiel 3:3 (KJV)
And he said unto me, Son of man, cause thy belly to eat, and fill thy bowels with this roll that I give thee. Then did I eat it; and it was in my mouth as honey for sweetness.


Truth: Bitter or Sweet?

I’d had the spot on my nose for the better part of a year when I went to the doctor. The biopsy results came back days later with words I didn’t want to hear: skin cancer. Though the cancer was operable and not life-threatening, it was a bitter pill to swallow.

God commanded Ezekiel to swallow a bitter pill—a scroll containing words of lament and woe (Ezekiel 2:10; 3:1–2). He was “to fill [his] stomach with it” and share the words with the people of Israel, whom God considered “obstinate and stubborn” (2:4). One would expect a scroll filled with correction to taste like a bitter pill. Yet Ezekiel describes it being “as sweet as honey” in his mouth (3:3).

Ezekiel seems to have acquired a taste for God’s correction. Instead of viewing His rebuke as something to avoid, Ezekiel recognized that what is good for the soul is “sweet.” God instructs and corrects us with lovingkindness, helping us live in a way that honors and pleases Him.

Some truths are bitter pills to swallow while others taste sweet. If we remember how much God loves us, His truth will taste more like honey. His words are given to us for our good, providing wisdom and strength to forgive others, refrain from gossip, and bear up under mistreatment. Help us, God, to recognize Your wisdom as the sweet counsel it truly is!


Reflect & Pray
What truth has God shown you recently? Did you receive it as a bitter pill or sweet honey?

God, Your truth is sweet.


Insight
Ezekiel isn’t the only prophet instructed by God to eat “the scroll” of lament and judgment (2:9–3:3). The apostle John on Patmos Island was similarly ordered to eat a scroll. Because John prophesied bitter judgment and untold suffering for God’s people, the scroll “[turned his] stomach sour” (Revelation 10:9). And yet because it was God’s Word, it “tasted as sweet as honey in [his] mouth” (v. 10). This is the consistent testimony of people who love God: His Word is “more precious than gold, . . . sweeter than honey . . . from the honeycomb” (Psalm 19:10).
  

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference.
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Re: A Daily Prayer for all
Reply #4104 - 10/18/19 at 05:26:43
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Acts 16:26 (KJV)
And suddenly there was a great earthquake, so that the foundations of the prison were shaken: and immediately all the doors were opened, and every one's bands were loosed.


When We Praise

When nine-year-old Willie was abducted from his front yard in 2014, he sang his favorite gospel song Every Praise over and over again. During the three-hour ordeal, Willie ignored the kidnapper’s repeated orders to keep silent as they drove around. Eventually, the kidnapper let Willie out of the car unharmed. Later, Willie described the encounter, saying that while he felt his fear give way to faith, the abductor seemed agitated by the song.

Willie’s response to his dire situation is reminiscent of the experience shared by Paul and Silas. After being flogged and thrown into jail, they reacted by “praying and singing hymns to God, and the other prisoners were listening to them. Suddenly there was such a violent earthquake that the foundations of the prison were shaken. At once all the prison doors flew open, and everyone’s chains came loose” (Acts 16:25–26).

Upon witnessing this awesome demonstration of power, the jailer believed in the God of Paul and Silas, and his entire household was baptized along with him (vv. 27–34). Through the avenue of praise, both physical and spiritual chains were broken that night.

We may not always experience a visibly dramatic rescue like Paul and Silas, or like Willie. But we know that God responds to the praises of His people! When He moves, chains fall apart.


Reflect & Pray
What lessons do you learn from the prayer session held by Paul and Silas? How can you apply these principles to the difficult circumstances you experience?

Psalm 22:3 (KJV)
But thou art holy, O thou that inhabitest the praises of Israel.


Insight
Who was Paul? Paul, also known as Saul of Tarsus, was a zealous persecutor of the early church—until his dramatic conversion to Christ (Acts 7:58; 8:3; 9:1–19; Galatians 1:13–14). He describes himself as “circumcised on the eighth day, of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of Hebrews; in regard to the law, a Pharisee” (Philippians 3:5). Paul’s birthplace was in Tarsus, a city which lay on a major trade route in the province of Cilicia in Asia Minor. He was a Jew but also a Roman citizen by birth, which meant Paul probably received a Greek education as a youth. He was also well educated in the Old Testament and the Law through his training under the great teacher Gamaliel (Acts 22:3).
  

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference.
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Re: A Daily Prayer for all
Reply #4105 - 10/19/19 at 05:21:29
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John 8:7 (KJV)
So when they continued asking him, he lifted up himself, and said unto them, He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her.


Steel and Velvet

Poet Carl Sandburg wrote of former US president Abraham Lincoln, “Not often in the story of mankind does a man arrive on earth who is both steel and velvet, . . . who holds in his heart and mind the paradox of terrible storm and peace unspeakable and perfect.” “Steel and velvet” described how Lincoln balanced the power of his office with concern for individuals longing for freedom.

Only one person in all history perfectly balanced strength and gentleness, power and compassion. That man is Jesus Christ. In John 8, when confronted by the religious leaders to condemn a guilty woman, Jesus displayed both steel and velvet. He showed steel by withstanding the demands of a bloodthirsty mob, instead turning their critical eyes upon themselves. He said to them, “Let any one of you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her” (v. 7). Then Jesus modeled the velvet of compassion by telling the woman, “Neither do I condemn you . . . . Go now and leave your life of sin” (v. 11).

Reflecting His “steel and velvet” in our own responses to others can reveal the Father’s work of conforming us to be like Jesus. We can show His heart to a world hungry for both the velvet of mercy and the steel of justice.


Reflect & Pray
How does your response to the brokenness of this world compare to Christ’s balance of mercy and justice? Where do you need God’s help to enable you to show His compassion to others?

Dear Father, I thank You for Your Son, whose strength and tenderness perfectly reveal Your heart for our lost world.


Insight
In the account in John 8:1–11, it’s interesting that the religious leaders bring only the woman caught in the act of adultery. Women were particularly drawn to Jesus and were more courageous in following Him than most of His disciples. Only John stayed with Jesus all the way to the cross, but Matthew tells us “many women were there” (27:55–56). Women weren’t drawn to Jesus because He was physically attractive (see Isaiah 53:2). They loved Him because He saw them as fully human. He treated them with the respect other men didn’t show them. Today’s story is one example of that, as Jesus protects the woman’s dignity as a human being.
  

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference.
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Re: A Daily Prayer for all
Reply #4106 - 10/20/19 at 09:22:39
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Romans 16:7 (KJV)
Salute Andronicus and Junia, my kinsmen, and my fellow-prisoners, who are of note among the apostles, who also were in Christ before me.


Not Second Rate

After the conclusion of the First World War, US President Woodrow Wilson was recognized as one of the most powerful leaders on earth. But few knew that after a devastating stroke in 1919, it was his wife who managed nearly all of his affairs, determining which issues should be brought to his attention. In fact, modern historians believe that for a short while, it was really Edith Wilson who served as the president of the United States.

If asked to name the leaders of the early church, most of us would list Peter, Paul, and Timothy as a handful possessing well-documented gifts. But in Romans 16, Paul lists nearly forty people of diverse backgrounds—men, women, slaves, Jews, and gentiles—all of whom contributed to the life of the church in diverse ways.

And far from considering them second-rate members of the church, it’s clear that Paul held these people in the highest regard. He describes them as outstanding among the apostles (v. 7)—people to be celebrated for their service for Jesus.

Many of us feel that we’re too ordinary to be leaders in the church. But the truth is that each of us has gifts that can be used to serve and help others. In God’s strength, let’s use our gifts to His honor!


Reflect & Pray
As a member of the body of Christ, why should you never feel like you’re unimportant? What are some ways you can serve the people in your church?

Jesus, help me to remember that I am an important part of the body of Christ!


Insight
In Paul’s letters, he shows his appreciation for his fellow workers in the gospel by naming them, which gives us a window into his pastoral heart. He wasn’t just a great theologian; he was also a mentor and dependable friend. As he concludes his letter to the Romans (ch. 16), Paul specifically names those who tirelessly co-labored with him in the gospel. That many of these were women attests to the significant roles women played in the church. In Colossians, Paul warmly singled out ten associates—Jews and gentiles, slaves and free men, men and women (4:7–18). In the book of Acts and Paul’s New Testament letters combined, he expressed his appreciation and concern for some eighty fellow workers (see 2 Timothy 1:15–18; 4:9–22; Titus 3:12–13).
  

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference.
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Re: A Daily Prayer for all
Reply #4107 - 10/21/19 at 04:52:42
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John 6:51 (KJV)
I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world.


A Feast of Love

In the Danish film Babette’s Feast, a French refugee appears in a coastal village. Two elderly sisters, leaders of the community’s religious life, take her in, and for fourteen years Babette works as their housekeeper. When Babette comes into a large sum of money, she invites the congregation of twelve to join her for an extravagant French meal of caviar, quail in puff pastry, and more.

As they move from one course to the next, the guests relax; some find forgiveness, some find love rekindled, and some begin recalling miracles they’d witnessed and truths they’d learned in childhood. “Remember what we were taught?” they say. “Little children, love one another.” When the meal ends, Babette reveals to the sisters that she spent all she had on the food. She gave everything—including any chance of returning to her old life as an acclaimed chef in Paris—so that her friends, eating, might feel their hearts open.

Jesus appeared on earth as a stranger and servant, and He gave everything so that our spiritual hunger might be satisfied. In John’s gospel, He reminds His listeners that when their ancestors wandered hungry in the wilderness, God provided quail and bread (Exodus 16). That food satisfied for a time, but Jesus promises that those who accept Him as the “bread of life” will “live forever” (John 6:48, 51). His sacrifice satisfies our spiritual cravings.


Reflect & Pray
How has God satisfied your hunger? What might it look like for you to give sacrificially?

Jesus, thank You for giving Your body and blood for us.


Insight
Of all the “signs” (miracles) Jesus performed, John only records seven that point to Jesus as God’s Son (John 20:30–31). The miracle of the multiplication of the fish and loaves in 6:1–14 is one of those. (It also appears in the other gospels—Matthew 14:13–21; Mark 6:30–44; Luke 9:10–17.) The additional miracles John includes are changing water into wine (2:1–11), healing the official’s son (4:46–54), healing the paralyzed man (5:1–15), walking on water (6:16–21), healing the man born blind (9:1–7), and raising Lazarus from the dead (11:1–45).
  

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference.
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Re: A Daily Prayer for all
Reply #4108 - 10/22/19 at 08:19:14
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Psalm 116:8-9 (KJV)
8 For thou hast delivered my soul from death, mine eyes from tears, and my feet from falling.
9 I will walk before the Lord in the land of the living.


Good News for Feet

The ad brought a smile to my face: “The most comfortable socks in the history of feet.” Then, extending its claim of good news for feet even further, the advertiser said that because socks remain the most requested clothing item at homeless shelters, for every pair of socks purchased the company would donate a pair to someone in need.

Imagine the smile when Jesus healed the feet of a man who hadn’t been able to walk for thirty-eight years (John 5:2–8). Now imagine the opposite look on the faces of the temple officials who weren’t impressed by Jesus’s care for the feet or heart of someone who had gone without help for so long. They accused the man and Jesus of breaking a religious law that allows no work to be done on the Sabbath (vv. 9–10, 16–17). They saw rules where Jesus saw the need for mercy.

At this point the man didn’t even know who had given him new feet. Only later would he be able to say that it was Jesus who had made him well (vv. 13–15)—the same Jesus who would allow His own feet to be nailed to a tree to offer that man—and us—the best news in the history of broken bodies, minds, and hearts.


Reflect & Pray
What needs do you see in those around you? In what ways have you seen Jesus meet your own needs?

Jesus, allow me to see and meet the needs of others.


Insight
In Luke 4:18–19, Jesus begins His ministry by quoting from Isaiah (61:1–2) that the Messiah would perform miracles. Christ’s miracles served as proof that He was indeed the Messiah. In John 5, Jesus directly confronted the religious leaders about His identity. When they began to persecute Him for working on the Sabbath, He referred to God as “my Father” (v. 17) and stated that God too worked (on the Sabbath). As evidence of His deity, Jesus pointed to the miracle He’d just performed, saying that as the Father gives life so does the Son (v. 21). In other words, He wouldn’t have been able to restore the paralyzed man’s legs if He were not doing it through the power of the Father.


  

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference.
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Re: A Daily Prayer for all
Reply #4109 - 10/23/19 at 06:12:12
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James 3:10 (KJV)
Out of the same mouth proceedeth blessing and cursing. My brethren, these things ought not so to be.


This Is Me

The powerful song “This Is Me” is an unforgettable show tune featured in The Greatest Showman, the smash movie musical loosely based on the life of P. T. Barnum and his traveling circus. The lyrics, sung by characters in the film who’d suffered verbal taunts and abuse for failing to conform to societal norms, describe words as destructive bullets and knives that leave scars.

The song’s popularity points to how many people bear the invisible, but real, wounds caused by weaponized words.

James understood the potential danger of our words to cause destructive and long-lasting harm, calling the tongue “a restless evil, full of deadly poison” (James 3:8). By using this surprisingly strong comparison, James emphasized the urgent need for believers to recognize the immense power of their words. Even more, he highlighted the inconsistency of praising God with one breath and then injuring people who are made in God’s image with the next (vv. 9–10).

The song “This Is Me” similarly challenges the truth of verbal attacks by insisting that we’re all glorious—a truth the Bible affirms. The Bible establishes the unique dignity and beauty of each human being, not because of outward appearance or anything we have done, but because we are each beautifully designed by God—His unique masterpieces (Psalm 139:14). And our words to each other and about each other have the power to reinforce that reassuring reality.


Reflect & Pray
Whose forgiveness might you need to seek for using damaging words? How might you encourage someone today?

Creator God, thank You for creating each of us. Help us to use our words both in praise of You and to encourage the people You expertly designed.


Insight
James’s strong warning on the danger of misusing our words comes in the context of a focus on the influence of teachers (3:1). Because our language is capable of causing great division and harm, especially when wielded by those with power and influence, James is emphasizing how essential humility is for true wisdom (vv. 2, 13). In that context, when he claims that “no human being can tame the tongue” (v. 8), he’s not excusing harmful language (as though since failing is inevitable we might as well give up), but once again emphasizing the need for humility.
  

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference.
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